Category Archives: Case Results

Wrongful Termination — Former Teacher Awarded $3.5 Million

What a difference being a government employee makes. Most workers are at-will employees and can be terminated without cause on the whim of the employer, but teachers can only be terminated for cause. In the case of Lyndsey Wilcox v. Newark Valley Central School District, that distinction led to a huge verdict.

A jury on Wednesday awarded close to $3.5 million in damages to Wilcox, who alleged she was fired without cause. Wilcox was dating another teacher when it was discovered that he was acting inappropriately toward female students. He was ultimately convicted of sex offenses and sentenced to 30 years in prison. Wilcox successfully argued that she was only terminated for the sins of her boyfriend.

The jury deliberated for about three hours before returning with a verdict awarding Wilcox $351,990 for lost wages and $2.1 million for future lost earnings and $1 million for emotional distress.

Hostile Work Environment — The Law Does Not Promise a Utopian Workplace

I don’t often set forth an entire opinion, but the following case out of the Third Circuit provides a very good summary of what constitutes a “hostile work environment”, while at the same time demonstrating how the facts of a case are dissected and examined.  If you are contemplating a wrongful termination action in general or a hostile work environment action in particular, this case is well worth reading.

The takeaways are:  (1) a mean boss does not (necessarily) a hostile work environment make, and (2) if individual acts are not “hostile”, then even 14 of those acts will not create a hostile work environment.

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Judge Upholds Termination Because “Lactation is not Pregnancy”

A judge in Houston has ruled in favor of an employer who allegedly fired a woman who wanted to use the bathroom to breast-pump.

Case facts are never black and white, and there are always complicating factors. Here, there was apparently some issue as to whether the employee abandoned her job, but the ruling of the judge is still hard to fathom.

The EEOC filed a complaint on behalf of Donnicia Venters against debt collection agency Houston Funding. Venters alleged that the company violated Title VII of the Civil Rights Act. Since only women can currently get pregnant, Title VII makes it illegal to discriminate “because of pregnancy, childbirth, or a medical condition related to pregnancy or childbirth” since by definition those issues would only arise as to women.rental mobil jakarta

However, Title VII doesn’t say anything about lactation, so Judge Lynn Hughes found that the lawsuit was not recognized under Title VII and dismissed the lawsuit. Judge Hughes ruled that “firing someone because of lactation or breast-pumping is not sex discrimination.”

The ruling is, of course, utter nonsense. Lactation occurs because of childbirth, and if a mother cannot pump or nurse, she is at risk of mastitis.

Thankfully, California already has laws in place to protect a woman’s right to breastfeed and/or pump.

For a more detailed discussion of the case, go here, where you can also listen to a recording of what sounds like the employer talking to Venters, explaining how she has no protections (which, if you believe the judge, turned out to be correct), and how generous they are being by showing that she resigned her job (which, of course, denies her unemployment).